Irish Pseudohistory and Lore of Master Poets Part 5

Many of the Tuatha Dé bear names that explicity connect them with the arts with one very obvious example being Credne, the divine bronze-crafter, whose name etymologically means the ‘skilled one’ and is related to cerd meaning ‘art’, ‘skill’ and/or ‘artisan’ (‘Iddánach, Ildírech:A Festschrift for Proinsias Mac Cana’ JT Koch, J Carey & PY Lambert).Continue reading “Irish Pseudohistory and Lore of Master Poets Part 5”

Irish Pseudohistory and Lore of the Master Poets Part 4

The second section of the Tuatha Dé interlude in the ‘Book of Invasions’ is a chronological list of their rulers/kings with the length of their reigns; Núada 7 years, Brés 7 years, Núada (2nd reign with silver arm) 20 years, Lugh 40 years, an Dagda 80 years, Delbaeth 10 years, Fíachu mac Delbaeth 10 years,Continue reading “Irish Pseudohistory and Lore of the Master Poets Part 4”

Cultural Appreciation/ Appropriation

Before we discuss this controversial subject, let’s discuss what we mean by the two terms. Cultural Appreciation – appreciation is when you seek to understand and learn about other cultures in an effort to broaden your perspective and connect with others cross-culturally. Appropriation is when you take, adopt or invent aspects of a culture thatContinue reading “Cultural Appreciation/ Appropriation”

Irish Pseudohistory and Lore of the Master Poets Part 3

When we turn to what the ‘Lebór Gabála’ actually says about the reign of the Tuatha Dé, the account of their soveignity over the Island falls into 3 sections. The 1st is of their invasion and defeat of the Fir Bolg (the first battle of Moytura). The 2nd provides a list of their kings, andContinue reading “Irish Pseudohistory and Lore of the Master Poets Part 3”

Irish Pseudohistory and Lore of the Master Poets Part 2

The Irish pseudohistorical tradition is quite plainly a rat’s nest but, the stages of it’s growth can be reconstructed (‘Leabhar Gabhála, Part 1’ Snowcroft). The point may not need labouring, but the story of successive invasions is demonstrably not pre-Christian as it developed gradually in early Christian Ireland (‘Native Elements in Irish Pseudohistory’ J CareyContinue reading “Irish Pseudohistory and Lore of the Master Poets Part 2”

Irish Pseudohistory and Lore of the Master Poets Part 1

There is a certain orchestrated haziness of the way in which the authors of sagas have handled native Gods, and this can be exploited for literary effect. As with Manannán’s epiphany to Bran, or that of Midir to the unhappy Eochaid Airem, the Gods intrude and then are lost in sight, leaving the question ofContinue reading “Irish Pseudohistory and Lore of the Master Poets Part 1”

St. Patrick, St. Sheelah and the Spring Equinox

Before the Spring Equinox approaches in Ireland, St. Sheelah’s Day is celebrated after St. Patrick’s Day. St. Sheelah was supposedly St.Patrick’s wife, but just as Brigid was changed from goddess to saint, so Sheelah was the original honoured at the Spring Equinox as Sheela-na-gig. Figures of this Celtic fertility Goddess who clutches her vulva withContinue reading “St. Patrick, St. Sheelah and the Spring Equinox”

The Concept of the Irish Family Pantheon: Imported or Native

Because Irish written records did not manifest until the 8th Century, we can be thankful to the Early Irish monks who captured the old legends and sagas through script, although using a Christain filter. It is difficult to know exactly when a society exchanges one religion for another as it takes time but we knowContinue reading “The Concept of the Irish Family Pantheon: Imported or Native”

The Stone Circles of West Cork

The oldest known Megalithic structure in Ireland is that of Newgrange in the Boyne Valley. It dates to around 3,200 BCE and predates both Stonehenge and the Great Pyramid of Giza. Southwest Munster, and West Cork in particular, is home to the greatest concentration in Ireland of stone circles. There are two main kinds recordedContinue reading “The Stone Circles of West Cork”

Fleadh Cheoil

Fleadh Cheoil (festival of music) is an Irish music festival run by Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann (CCÉ), a non-profit organisation. The first national festival of Irish traditional music was held in Mullingar in 1951. At its inaugural meeting in September 1951, CCÉ came up with the title of Fleadh Cheoil, aiming to make this a great national festival of traditional music. The fleadh has beenContinue reading “Fleadh Cheoil”